RegisterSearchFAQMemberlistUsergroupsLog in
Reply to topic Page 2 of 2
Goto page Previous  1, 2
Question about home A/C and energy usage
Author Message
Reply with quote
Post  
Hmm, first I'd heard of any problems with them, course it only makes sense that something would go wrong with them. Still, that was the 90s, almost 10 years ago. Surely they've made improvements to the system, as the hose is supposed to have a 50 year warranty?

View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Reply with quote
Post  
I had a 2-ton 10 seer (I think) 18 year old Trane at my last condo. I replaced only the compressor with a new 10 seer 2-ton Fridgidare for $1600 installed (not sure who really makes this, looks like an American Standard but is probably Goodman???). My summer bills dropped by 40% and the new unit was able to keep my upstairs loft area as cool as I wanted it (typically 72 degrees), the old unit could only cool the loft down to 77-80 on days over 100 outside. I eventually replaced the inside unit with a Firt ???, this is one of those apartment style in ceiling POS...it was only $800 installed and didn't make a noticable saving in bills but was much quieter and the electric heat worked much better.

View user's profile Send private message
Reply with quote
Post  
Lincoln wrote:
I had a 2-ton 10 seer (I think) 18 year old Trane at my last condo. I replaced only the compressor with a new 10 seer 2-ton Fridgidare for $1600 installed (not sure who really makes this, looks like an American Standard but is probably Goodman???). My summer bills dropped by 40% and the new unit was able to keep my upstairs loft area as cool as I wanted it (typically 72 degrees), the old unit could only cool the loft down to 77-80 on days over 100 outside. I eventually replaced the inside unit with a Firt ???, this is one of those apartment style in ceiling POS...it was only $800 installed and didn't make a noticable saving in bills but was much quieter and the electric heat worked much better.


The indoor section was probably a First Company unit...We've installed 2 of those in the past month.

Frigidaire is made by Nordyne. They have a new system that gets up to 23 SEER but only have it available from 2-4 ton (no 5-ton)
It has a compressor that is variable capacity and uses a AC to DC converter on it it also uses an electronic expansion valve ....both of these are fairly new technology on residential equipment

View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Reply with quote
Post  
Speeder wrote:
Hmm, first I'd heard of any problems with them, course it only makes sense that something would go wrong with them. Still, that was the 90s, almost 10 years ago. Surely they've made improvements to the system, as the hose is supposed to have a 50 year warranty?


I would hope that they had all the bugs worked out by now. The 50 year warranty on the hose is on the hose only, who is gonna pay to re-drill and re-grout the holes and install the hose....this was the situation we ran into on a house on Galveston Island...he had a warranty on the hose but at that time it ran $1200 per hole to drill and grout and it takes 1 hole per ton of A/C. He ended up installing a 13SEER conventional DX system instead.

View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Reply with quote
Post  
Heh heh heh.. that's funny, 1200 a hole to replace the hose under warranty. Yeah, I guess they wouldn't be able to reuse the hose since the hose has to be in contact with the ground. I'll have to give this some more thought now, there has to be a way around this.

View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Reply with quote
Post  
Speeder wrote:
Heh heh heh.. that's funny, 1200 a hole to replace the hose under warranty. Yeah, I guess they wouldn't be able to reuse the hose since the hose has to be in contact with the ground. I'll have to give this some more thought now, there has to be a way around this.


The loops (hose) is buried and packed in with a special grout that will ensure the transfer of heat to the earth.

I'm not saying that it isn't a viable alternative, its that my experiences with both the closed loop and open loop geothermal systems have been negative and with conventional systems getting up into the 20SEER range on cooling, the 96 % AFUE range on gas/propane heat, it warrants a hard look before sinking that kind of money into geothermal.

View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Reply with quote
Post  
Speeder wrote:
If you haven't already, flourescents are a great way to save energy, and ceiling fans will help keep things cooler with a higher temp reading. And, believe it or not, adding the thermal window tint makes a big difference on the glass temps when it's hot out. Doesn't do a whole lot in the winter. Then there are thermal curtains for the east and west sides of the house. My own power bill on a 1950 sq ft place was 168 for last month and it's been upper 90s to the 100s all month. Worse, I've got those damned cathedral ceilings in the place. I'll never buy another one with cathedrals in it, that's about another 800 sq ft of space I'm having to heat and cool and am getting no use out of it, worse you have to blare the TV to hear it. From now on, 8 foot ceilings is high enough for me, no more than 9 foot.


Done this already...all the lights I actually use for any length of time are flourescent...kitchen light is flourescent bars (one side of which is burnt out for 50% energy savings...too busy to fix at moment)...and the office light is one of those trick phillips bulbs.

Place does have cathedral ceilings, but the bigger design problem is just having a loft. There's a 10* difference between loft and ground level. I'm able to equalize that a bit more by putting a box fan by the railing and having the upstairs window open to vent heat (even with the A/C on). Having the upstairs window open actually tends to require the A/C to run LESS, believe it or not.

Just curious here..but assuming you don't have a loft, cathedral ceilings would help you in the summer and hurt you in the winter on energy use, right?

View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Reply with quote
Post  
yes...thermodynamics, heat rises and cold air falls.

View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Reply with quote
Post  
Depends on whether the system is designed well. I think the contractor must have specced my place for an HVAC system as though it were all 8 footers, because the air temp is only manageable if all the ceiling fans are on. Then, if my bedroom door is closed, there is considerable force blowing under the door. There should be about 6 more vents in the rest of the house IMO, because there should be some air movement under the door but not the amount I have. Then, not having an air space between the inside and outside roof really hurts. With a standard ceiling, you can keep the air in the attic at the same temperature as the outside with exhaust fans, so the heat absorbed by the shingles makes no difference. With cathedrals, you have shingles, plywood, insulation, then sheetrock, with no room for air movement. Sunlight heats it all up until the inside roof is radiating heat, and this radiant heat starts warming the air considerably as soon as it comes out of the vents. Ceiling fans help by keeping this air spread around so it raises the air to the same temp throughout the room, which then lets the thermostat have a better idea of what it's working with. Without the fans, the big rooms are hot and the small rooms are freezing.

In short, know your builder.

View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Reply with quote
Post  
Mike wrote:
Pro wrote:
oooo ooooo oooo do me do me do me

Janitrol MLE 42-1B and CAPF036B2C whatever all that means

yay


This unit was made from 1990-1992 and was a 9 SEER nominal 3.5 ton (42,000 BTU) unit. It only got 39,000 BTU according to my info.

Janitrol/Goodman/GMC makes the cheapest unit in the market.



Hmmmm dont know what all that means but I assume it sucks. House was built in 91

View user's profile Send private message
Reply with quote
Post  
Not so much sucks as much as doesn't have the same build quality. They were the first to come out with a 5 year warranty on all parts.......they need it.
I remember uncrating units and having to put the screws back in them, they would be laying in the bottom of the crate. They tended to vibrate a lot when started up and just don't seem to last as long as the Lennox, Carrier or Trane (American Standard).

If you are going to stay there another 6+ years, look at upgrading to the highest efficiency system you can and go for the variable speed blower upgrade when you do it. An 18 SEER unit will be more than 50% more efficient than your unit when it was new....you're in Texas aren't you? You should be seeing about the same electric bills as I do here in Houston and I paid $.175 per KW hour last month. That is double what I paid 4-5 years ago and I'm told that it won't be going back down.

View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Reply with quote
Post  
Hmmm ok, so give me a unit model and I will take a look. What about brand?
Im sure I can make it thru this summer though. Maybe they will go down in price over the winter time.

View user's profile Send private message
Reply with quote
Post  
the Carrier 24ANA748 is the 17 SEER series 4-ton unit (actual SEER will be around 15) and the 24ANA148 is the 21 SEER series 4-ton unit (actual SEER will be around 18-19). These are both multistage units, compressor goes from 4-ton to around 2-ton when the weather is milder....These units are rated at high speed and on low speed the SEER gets higher http://www.carrierresidential.com/carrier/acInfinity.asp

The gas furnace I'd recommend would be the 80% AFUE 2-stage heat, variable speed blower Carrier 58CVA090-16 http://www.carrierresidential.com/carrier/Infinity80GasFurnace.asp it comes with a free high efficiency mechanical air cleaner. It is a dressed down version of this one http://www.residential.carrier.com/images/products/airq-airc-ezfx-lg.jpg. Be sure to get the Infinity controller http://www.residential.carrier.com/products/controls/infinity.shtml it gives you de-humidification on demand and will allow you access to your A/C system via the internet if you get the optional SAM (system access module).

The coil we use is the Carrier coil with the tin coated u-bends, it comes with a 10 yr part warranty instead of the 5 year warranty that the standard coil comes with http://www.residential.carrier.com/products/coils/evaporator/casedslab.shtml

fo a 4-ton system installed (replace existing) it will cost around $10,000+

View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Reply with quote
Post  
Should I wait until like the winter time before buying a new unit (when they are cheaper if they are). I guarantee with hotass weather down here, people are having replacements or work done. AC shops getting rich.

View user's profile Send private message
Reply with quote
Post  
Pro wrote:
Should I wait until like the winter time before buying a new unit (when they are cheaper if they are). I guarantee with hotass weather down here, people are having replacements or work done. AC shops getting rich.


Most A/C companies in the South are looking for work in Nov, Dec, Jan and Feb. I tend to give better deals during these months. I'm not sure about 2007 but in 2006 you can deduct $300 off of your taxes when you get anything higher than 15SEER

View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Reply with quote
Post  


View user's profile Send private message
Reply with quote
Post  
http://youtube.com/watch?v=oYeOzBymk6M

View user's profile Send private message
Reply with quote
Post  
Speeder wrote:
Depends on whether the system is designed well. I think the contractor must have specced my place for an HVAC system as though it were all 8 footers, because the air temp is only manageable if all the ceiling fans are on. Then, if my bedroom door is closed, there is considerable force blowing under the door. There should be about 6 more vents in the rest of the house IMO, because there should be some air movement under the door but not the amount I have. Then, not having an air space between the inside and outside roof really hurts. With a standard ceiling, you can keep the air in the attic at the same temperature as the outside with exhaust fans, so the heat absorbed by the shingles makes no difference. With cathedrals, you have shingles, plywood, insulation, then sheetrock, with no room for air movement. Sunlight heats it all up until the inside roof is radiating heat, and this radiant heat starts warming the air considerably as soon as it comes out of the vents. Ceiling fans help by keeping this air spread around so it raises the air to the same temp throughout the room, which then lets the thermostat have a better idea of what it's working with. Without the fans, the big rooms are hot and the small rooms are freezing.

In short, know your builder.


I agree with details you mentioned about ceiling fan design. Fans are important for any size of fans.

View user's profile Send private message
Display posts from previous:
Reply to topic Page 2 of 2
Goto page Previous  1, 2
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum