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Flat plane 358cid GEN 4 engine 9200rpm
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Post Flat plane 358cid GEN 4 engine 9200rpm 
Crazy plumbing on this sucker, it for a GEN 5 Camaro.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HIxngbwE8jg


Running 8's with boost

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i-L9S_TDO9Y


peace
Hog

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So they made their own crank?

Advantage:
Less rotating mass = good for acceleration.

Better exhaust pulse spacing for a better use of exhaust energy.


Flat crank vs crossplane:

http://www.onallcylinders.com/2015/01/15/cross-plane-vs-flat-plane-crankshafts/

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Hmm, sounds good on paper, but one of the reasons I don't watch F1 racing is the engine tone sucks bad. It's like enduring a bee attack from inside a screened enclosure for several hours. I think I'll wait till I see one in person, and drive it, before I form an opinion.

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F1 no longer have flat plane crank as they are now tubo v6.

Favorite engine sound:

Crossplane V8 4.2
https://youtu.be/anwc-PTBFSA

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https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=-Pz4dYuQK_c

Thanks for sharing I enjoyed looking at different sounds and why they are made due to engine firing order, crankshaft style, etc.
I never knew of the reasons engines made different sounding tones before but the above link has some really neat information and video clips put together to explain in detail.

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Following that video, the cross-plane inline 4... I like.

https://youtu.be/-ZCaN9E406s?t=430

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Post Support Flat plane crank for SBC! 
http://gmauthority.com/blog/2015/09/flat-plane-crank-kit-for-small-block-v8s-needs-your-support/

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What I'd really like to see is an offset crank for the LS engine like the old full size RWD Grand National turbo V6 had. This gets you each cylinder pushing at its best angle, and consequently gets you equal time spans between all 8 cylinder fires.

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If this is what you mean by offset crank, then it's not needed for a v8, only for a V6 90*, to achieve a firing pulse every 120*

Now, if you're talking about off-set cylinder banks, that could be intersting



Quote:
The firing forces, however, are balanced in modern V-6s. A V-6 fires a cylinder every time the crankshaft turns 120 degrees (720/6=120). That would imply a 120-degree angle between the banks, but that configuration is impractical for packaging reasons. The 60-degree bank angle is a good compromise for packaging, and because the firing events occur in degrees (120) that are evenly divisible by the angle of the V (60), the firing forces remain balanced.

So how do GM and Mercedes-Benz get away with 90-degree V-6s? These engines would seem to have unbalanced firing pulses because 120 isn’t evenly divisible by 90. When GM reintroduced its V-6 engines back in the mid-Seventies, it revived an early-Sixties design, which was essentially a Buick 90-degree V-8 with the two end cylinders sliced off. Because of the firing imbalance, the engine ran rough, sort of like a V-8 with two cylinders missing. To counteract this, the company developed a special crankshaft called a “split-pin” or “split-journal” unit that mounted the big ends of the paired connecting rods to crank journals that had been split and slightly offset so that the engine could achieve 120-degree firing despite its V angle.


http://www.caranddriver.com/features/the-physics-of-engine-cylinder-bank-angles-feature

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I see. Learn something new every day. Thanks!

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Thats where we start talking about "Even fire" and "Semi Even Fire" and "Odd Fire" in the V6 world. Looking through older GM Performance Parts catalogs it gets kinda confusing when talking about all the different V6 parts.

peace
Hog

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